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DSUSB Cable alternative (MC-DC2_USB) - User Instructions


SteveRosenow
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I feel since there have been several orders for this cable trickling in, and since my printer died before I could print off the instructions I had formatted out for each order, I figured I would post them here.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

1.)  Upon the receipt of the MC-DC2_USB2.0 cable, you will first need to plug the USB end of the cable into your computer.  This is to allow for Windows to find and locate the drivers needed if they aren't previously loaded in your particular install of Windows (NOTE: These were tested on a system which is powered by Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit, Service Pack 1). This process uses the "Found new Hardware" wizard that automatically pops up, and it downloads the drivers directly through Microsoft Windows Update if needed. This process takes anywhere between 30 seconds to five minutes depending on your internet speed.

2.)  After your cable is fully recognized by Windows, insert it into the MC-DC2's cable port on the left side of the camera body. Then insert the second OEM USB cable into the camera. Following that, connect the USB ends of both cables to your computer's available USB ports.

3.)   Load BackyardNIKON. Once BackyardNIKON has loaded and all Nikon drivers have initialized, turn on the camera, then wait ten seconds. After ten seconds, click the "Connect" camera icon at the upper left corner of the BackyardNIKON application window (See Fig. 1 below). 

post-3105676-141893876494_thumb.png 


Once BackyardNIKON has loaded and your camera is connected, locate the Capture Plan center on the right hand side of the window. The MC-DC2_USB2.0 cable utilizes a TTL-Serial output line. Select the drop down menu labeled "Cable support" in the Capture Plan center in Fig. 2 (below). 

post-3105676-141893876504_thumb.png 

Once the menu expands, you will see the following in Fig. 3:

post-3105676-141893876521_thumb.png 

4.) The next step involves trial-and-error. As each TTL-Serial USB plug has a different chipset, in addition to each USB port having its own designator, you will need to go through a process of elimination. Starting with Serial COM1, return to the Capture Plan center and initiate a 10 SECOND BULB exposure in the exposure control settings. This will determine the settings you will need to use.

If the first BULB exposure immediately aborts, move down the list. Those that abort immediately are Serial Com ports that do not exist or will not work with the cable. 

A successful test is denoted by the camera shutter activating and the countdown timer initializing in the right hand portion of the window, after a few seconds a test image will show up.

 

 

 

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4.) The next step involves trial-and-error. As each TTL-Serial USB plug has a different chipset, in addition to each USB port having its own designator, you will need to go through a process of elimination. Starting with Serial COM1, return to the Capture Plan center and initiate a 10 SECOND BULB exposure in the exposure control settings. This will determine the settings you will need to use.

 

 

Steve,

 

Great product BTW!

 

Rather than trial and error, may be better to direct people to look in the Windows Device Manager application and see which COM port has been designated by expanding Ports (COM & LPT) - see enclosed below. Running Device Manager is simple enough - just type "Device Manager" in Windows run box - or find it in Control Panel.  Also a useful diagnostic step to ensure Windows has correctly identified device and installed the necessary driver.

 

The COM port required in BYN will be the one in brackets after the USB Serial Port obviously :)

If users have more than one USB Serial Port (due to some other connected device), it'll be the one added to the list when your cable is attached to their computer ;)

 

 

post-3124576-141893876601_thumb.png

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4.) The next step involves trial-and-error. As each TTL-Serial USB plug has a different chipset, in addition to each USB port having its own designator, you will need to go through a process of elimination. Starting with Serial COM1, return to the Capture Plan center and initiate a 10 SECOND BULB exposure in the exposure control settings. This will determine the settings you will need to use.

 

 

Steve,

 

Great product BTW!

 

Rather than trial and error, may be better to direct people to look in the Windows Device Manager application and see which COM port has been designated by expanding Ports (COM & LPT) - see enclosed below. Running Device Manager is simple enough - just type "Device Manager" in Windows run box - or find it in Control Panel.  Also a useful diagnostic step to ensure Windows has correctly identified device and installed the necessary driver.

 

The COM port required in BYN will be the one in brackets after the USB Serial Port obviously :)

If users have more than one USB Serial Port (due to some other connected device), it'll be the one added to the list when your cable is attached to their computer ;)

 

 

devmgr.png

 

 

That is not a question for Steve who builds the cable but rather for me (Guylain) who builds the software :)

 

You bring a good point, but even if I would do that it is not fool proof by a country mile.  If you have 2 such cables or any other devices using a com port would would still need to manually look and guess via trial and error.  This is a catch 22.

 

 

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That is not a question for Steve who builds the cable but rather for me (Guylain) who builds the software :)

 

You bring a good point, but even if I would do that it is not fool proof by a country mile.  If you have 2 such cables or any other devices using a com port would would still need to manually look and guess via trial and error.  This is a catch 22.

 

 

Fair enough - did wonder 5s after posting whether my allocated COM port in Device Mgr was just co-incidence that is worked in BYN on the same port.

 

Fab software BTW!!!

 

 

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Got my cable today from Steven :-) Just finished the installation on a Lenovo G50-70 running Windows 8.1 and all is working as expected on my D7K. Now I just want for the weather to improve a bit to try a little shooting around Hercules... 

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Picked My Cable up yesterday. The post office where holding it it till I paid import tax on it. You got to love them £16 though was a little steep but anyway I have it now so thanks. was just coming on here to do a thead asking how I use is and this thread was near the top of the page. So thanks for this as well. 

So thank you

rob

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Just done your walk thru and have just done a 35 sec exposure in bulb sorted :) Would like to add at this point I am no good with computers so am happy. but may start having prob in a min My lappy only has 2 USB slots and I need 1 for my Mount so that leaves 1 for every thing else have bough a USB hub so will see how I get on now.

 

 

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Now that you've added a USB Hub to your kit, you'll want to "Organize the Attachments" such that your highest Data-Throughput Device is attached directly to a Laptop USB Port (leaving all other Devices to be attached to through the USB Hub).

Since you are using BYN, it usually means that your DSLR wins that Data-Throughput measurement and should be attached directly to the Laptop.  If you add an Autoguider Camera, then THAT will trump even the DSLR and would need be the directly attached Device.

In any case, this means that your Mount and your MC-DC2_USB should both be attached to your USB Hub.  And this will likely affect the COM-port designation of that Device.

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Steve,

 

Are you still making cables for people? If so, I'd be interested in ordering one. I just downloaded BYN and have been testing it. Works great with 30s or less exposures, so I'm ready to get the cable. PM me and let me know price, ordering etc.

 

Thanks

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Steve,

 

Are you still making cables for people? If so, I'd be interested in ordering one. I just downloaded BYN and have been testing it. Works great with 30s or less exposures, so I'm ready to get the cable. PM me and let me know price, ordering etc.

 

Thanks

 

Steve has been inactive for about 2 months now.  Please use caution.  Some orders from mid-November have not yet been shipped from what I have heard.  I have no affiliation with Steve.

 

I recommend that your go over Shoestring Astronomy and get a DSUSB cable instead, they are very, very reliable cables.

 

Regards,

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Thanks for the advice Guy - I read some of the other threads afterwards. I'll head over to shoestring. Thanks!

 

Very nice product by the way - I've been trying it out over the last couple of days, works great!!  This was the last piece of the puzzle in being able to truly sit in my den and image on these cold Michigan winter nights without having to go out to the scope.

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Hi

please can anyone tell tell me were to get the correct cables to suite my Nikon 610?

 

Thank you

Keith

 

Just read previous posts! Steve, can you supply please? also, is there a restriction in length? or can they be made say 3-5m long?

 

Keith

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Hi

please can anyone tell tell me were to get the correct cables to suite my Nikon 610?

 

Thank you

Keith

 

Just read previous posts! Steve, can you supply please? also, is there a restriction in length? or can they be made say 3-5m long?

 

Keith

 

All you need with the D610 is the camera supplied usb cable.  No other cable is needed.

 

Please see the camera support grid.

http://www.otelescope.com/index.php?/store/product/4-backyardnikon-10-premium-edition/#cameragrid_bookmark

 

Regards,

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Here's my version of the USB-serial adapter cable for my Nikon D90.  

 

It was always my intention to butcher the MC-DC2 remote, as all I needed was the cable with the Nikon plug on the end, and the housing which is suitable to take the PCB.  

The PCB came with a mini-USB port, which meant I could run a USB to mini-USB cable through a hole in the back end of the housing.  I like the torpedo-in-the-middle-of-the-cable result, which keeps the cable ends as simple as possible.

 

About eight superfluous pins had to be removed from the PCB, then the transistor was carefully sculpted to fit the board and accept the resistor and diodes.  The board is not quite optimally positioned yet, and I think a small hole might be helpful to view the LED that indicates the circuit is live.  With, say, 1 metre of cable either side of the torpedo, I think this would be a great little product.

 

Thoughts, comments, feedback always appreciated!

 

post-8913-0-13557800-1447084852_thumb.jpg

post-8913-0-68859500-1447084861_thumb.jpg

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