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Canada's top-tier Telescopes & Accessories

10 products

  1. Explore Scientific: 6° Field of View 8x50 NON-Illuminated White Finder Scope with Bracket. Base sold separately, but is included on all Explore Scientific scopes. (White).

    This Explore Scientific Finder has 8X magnification and a 50mm objective. It is a nice upgrade for those who currently have a small finder and are looking for something a bit bigger and brighter! A classic straight-through design, the Explore 8 x 50 finder scope is non-illuminated, which is fine for most applications. A two ring finder bracket comes with this 8x50 finder scope, and has a dovetail foot that attaches to a variety of finder shoes and adapters

    .If you are looking for an illuminated finder scope by Explore Scientific, check out the straight-through version as well as the right angle finder.

    $109.99 USD
    4 in stock


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  2. Explore Scientific: The Explore Scientific 8×50 produces a wide 6° field of view and allows precision focus of both main objective and eyepiece illuminated reticle. A precision polished roof prism produces images that are right-side-up, left-to-right correct. In other words, things are not upside-down and backwards like most viewfinders. The illuminated reticle is truly designed for finding objects with its open center (so you don’t mask the object you are centering with cross hairs) and scale markings for 1.5°, 3°, and 4.5° (the edge of the field of view is the 6° boundary). The 55° apparent field, long eye-relief eyepiece produces a bright 15.5mm exit pupil and will allow you to find faint galaxies, comets, and nebulae. All optics are fully-multicoated to insure maximum contrast.

    $229.99 USD
    3 in stock


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  3. Explore Scientific: 6° Field of View 8x50 Polar Illuminated Erect Image Silver Right Angle Finder Scope; 90° Eyepiece; Bracket. Base sold separately, but is included on all Explore Scientific scopes. (Silver).

    The Explore Scientific Illuminated 8x50 Right Angle Finder Scope produces a wide 6° field of view and allows precision focus of both main objective and eyepiece illuminated reticle. Precision polished roof prism produces images that are right-side-up, left-to-right correct.60° apparent field, long eye-relief eyepiece produces a bright 6.25mm exit pupil. When polar aligning, this finder scope assists you visually by using star patterns for finding Polaris or Octans (usable in Northern or Southern hemispheres).

    All optics on the Explore Scientific Illuminated 8x50 Right Angle Finder Scope are fully-multi-coated to insure maximum contrast.

    With its northern and southern polar reference markings, Explore Scientific’s 8x50 Illuminated Polar Finder Scope allows for quick and precise polar alignments with any equatorial mount. The deep red illumination can be controlled by the variable brightness knob, which also serves as the illuminator's on/off switch. This finder features a 90° eyepiece, erect image viewing and a 7° field of view. It also offers precision focus of both the main objective and the eyepiece reticle.

    $289.99 USD
    2 in stock


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  4. Explore Scientific: Explore Scientific finder scope base with screws. Add an Explore Scientific Finder scope to your telescope with the help of this sturdy base. The Finder scope Base is built to accept the dovetail bracket for any of the Explore Scientific Finders. Each base comes with knurled knobs to lock the finder into place.

    $44.99 USD

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  5. Explore Scientific: Explore Scientific finderscope rings are all made for 50mm finders. Choose from a classic low profile bracket (about an inch tall), one that is a tad higher (1.5") or a high profile bracket that stands 4" above the finderscope base.

    Regardless of the height you choose, these brackets have two rings to hold your finder firmly yet gently, and each ring has three adjustment points. Heavy-duty plastic thumbscrews are included, and have large heads for easy adjustment even if you're wearing gloves.

    Because your telescope may not fit in its case with the finderscope attached, you will appreciate the quick release feature on Explore Scientific finder brackets. The bracket itself dovetails into the finder base (sold separately), and locks down with thumbscrews. It is a simple thing to remove or install your finder and bracket on your telescope in this manner.

     

    $54.99 USD

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  6. Explore Scientific: Explore Scientific finderscope rings are all made for 50mm finders. Choose from a classic low profile bracket (about an inch tall), one that is a tad higher (1.5") or a high profile bracket that stands 4" above the finderscope base.

    Regardless of the height you choose, these brackets have two rings to hold your finder firmly yet gently, and each ring has three adjustment points. Heavy-duty plastic thumbscrews are included, and have large heads for easy adjustment even if you're wearing gloves.

    Because your telescope may not fit in its case with the finderscope attached, you will appreciate the quick release feature on Explore Scientific finder brackets. The bracket itself dovetails into the finder base (sold separately), and locks down with thumbscrews. It is a simple thing to remove or install your finder and bracket on your telescope in this manner.

    To install your finder into the bracket, simply back the thumbscrews out so that you've opened up the full inside diameter of the rings. Slide the finder into place, and adjust the screws inward until your finderscope is securely held in position. You should have very rough alignment at this point, which means when you look through the finder and center an object, and then look through a low power eyepiece inserted in your telescope diagonal or focuser, that object will most likely be in the field of view, but not at or near the center (unless you are very lucky!). Doing that first fine alignment...the task of matching what's in your finder to what's in your eyepiece...can be tedious and frustrating sometimes, but once you complete the job, it should never be required again. Sure, you will have to tweak the adjustment every time you re-install the finder/bracket combo onto your telescope, but it should be fairly quick and simple.

    Here is a helpful hint when it comes time to do that first alignment. Set your telescope up in the daytime, and make sure you bring out a variety of eyepieces with you. Find an easy target that is relatively far away, like a streetlight or the top of a telephone pole. Starting with the lowest power eyepiece, adjust your finder bracket until you have "matching" views. The more accurate you are, the easier it will be when you trade out your low power eyepiece for something a little stronger.

    Now do just that; put in a medium-powered eyepiece and do the same thing, being as accurate as you can. Finally, it's time for the high-powered eyepiece. Once you have finished this alignment process, you can either wait for the sun to go down to finish tweaking your finder, or you can put your telescope away and wait until the next time. Either way, once it is dark, find something bright, like the Moon or Venus or Jupiter, and center it in your finder. Now install the medium-powered eyepiece and check your view. If the object is not centered, make your adjustments, then insert the high-powered eyepiece and check again. Once you have made the necessary tweaks, you are good to go. From now on, unless you remove the finder from the bracket or something else happens to severely change alignment, you should only have to make small tweaks before every observing session. I know it sounds like a lot of trouble to go through for such a "small" thing, but trust me, I have seen more beginners make the mistake of trying to do finder alignments in the dark on small, dim objects, and it is not a pretty sight! All they want to do is observe, and they feel like they are wasting precious time doing silly things. A well-aligned finder makes astronomy SO much easier...give yourself a break and do the hard part during the day, and you won't be sorry!

     

    $74.99 USD

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  7. Explore Scientific: Explore Scientific ''T'' Shaped finder scope base for Essential Series Telescopes with screws.

    The Explore Scientific T Shaped Finder Scope Base w/ Screws is specifically designed to allow you to secure a finder scope to your telescope. The Explore Scientific T-Shaped Essential Series Finder Scope Base w/ Mounting Screws is sturdy and comes with reliable mounting screws for easy installation.

    $44.99 USD

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  8. Explore Scientific: Explore Scientific finderscope rings are all made for 50mm finders. Choose from a classic low profile bracket (about an inch tall), one that is a tad higher (1.5") or a high profile bracket that stands 4" above the finderscope base.

    Regardless of the height you choose, these brackets have two rings to hold your finder firmly yet gently, and each ring has three adjustment points. Heavy-duty plastic thumbscrews are included, and have large heads for easy adjustment even if you're wearing gloves.

    Because your telescope may not fit in its case with the finderscope attached, you will appreciate the quick release feature on Explore Scientific finder brackets. The bracket itself dovetails into the finder base (sold separately), and locks down with thumbscrews. It is a simple thing to remove or install your finder and bracket on your telescope in this manner.

    To install your finder into the bracket, simply back the thumbscrews out so that you've opened up the full inside diameter of the rings. Slide the finder into place, and adjust the screws inward until your finderscope is securely held in position. You should have very rough alignment at this point, which means when you look through the finder and center an object, and then look through a low power eyepiece inserted in your telescope diagonal or focuser, that object will most likely be in the field of view, but not at or near the center (unless you are very lucky!). Doing that first fine alignment...the task of matching what's in your finder to what's in your eyepiece...can be tedious and frustrating sometimes, but once you complete the job, it should never be required again. Sure, you will have to tweak the adjustment every time you re-install the finder/bracket combo onto your telescope, but it should be fairly quick and simple.

    Here is a helpful hint when it comes time to do that first alignment. Set your telescope up in the daytime, and make sure you bring out a variety of eyepieces with you. Find an easy target that is relatively far away, like a streetlight or the top of a telephone pole. Starting with the lowest power eyepiece, adjust your finder bracket until you have "matching" views. The more accurate you are, the easier it will be when you trade out your low power eyepiece for something a little stronger.

    Now do just that; put in a medium-powered eyepiece and do the same thing, being as accurate as you can. Finally, it's time for the high-powered eyepiece. Once you have finished this alignment process, you can either wait for the sun to go down to finish tweaking your finder, or you can put your telescope away and wait until the next time. Either way, once it is dark, find something bright, like the Moon or Venus or Jupiter, and center it in your finder. Now install the medium-powered eyepiece and check your view. If the object is not centered, make your adjustments, then insert the high-powered eyepiece and check again. Once you have made the necessary tweaks, you are good to go. From now on, unless you remove the finder from the bracket or something else happens to severely change alignment, you should only have to make small tweaks before every observing session. I know it sounds like a lot of trouble to go through for such a "small" thing, but trust me, I have seen more beginners make the mistake of trying to do finder alignments in the dark on small, dim objects, and it is not a pretty sight! All they want to do is observe, and they feel like they are wasting precious time doing silly things. A well-aligned finder makes astronomy SO much easier...give yourself a break and do the hard part during the day, and you won't be sorry!

    $64.99 USD

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  9. Explore Scientific: Finder Scope Illuminator Only. This is the illuminator that comes standard with Explore Scientific's illuminated finder scopes. The wireless illuminator has adjustable brightness settings, allowing you to easily brighten or dim your finder's reticle to match the magnitude of the stars you are dealing with. The on-off switch at the end of the illuminator serves as the brightness control. Designed to fit Explore Scientific’s 50mm reticle finder scopes, this spare LED illuminator offers deep red illumination with variable brightness.

     

     

    $39.99 USD

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  10. Explore Scientific: Ever frustrated by the standard illuminator? Is the battery always dead when you turn it on? The Illuminator II now offers exceptional batter life for our VFEI0850–01 and VFEI0850-RA finder scopes OR most any other illuminated finder with a standard illuminator.

    The advantage of the Illuminator II is the power provided by 2 alkaline AAA batteries which will last AT LEAST 100X longer than the traditional illuminator. The Illuminator II also offers variable control from ultra-dim to very intense for proper illumination of the markings in the finder scope.

    To install your Illuminator II into the finder, simply unscrew the original illuminator and replace with the Illuminator II. It should be fairly quick and simple.

     

     

    $49.99 USD

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