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Planetary mode 5X overexposed but turning it off is fine.


banjo-n
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While photographing Jupiter and Saturn with canon 50D and celestron 8" sct, in planetary mode with 5X the capture is overexposed and can't correct it with shutter speed and ISO,but turning off the 5X the shutter speed and ISO settings works perfect?

 

Any help please!!!

Thanks, Kris.

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Enabling Maximum Sensitivity causes BYE to adjust the ISO and f-stop when you change from imaging to Frame & Focus or Planetary mode. I had thought that it also changed the exposure, but that does not appear to be the case.

Maximum Sensitivity is useful when trying to focus on a bright star. You should uncheck it for planetary imaging.

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You don't need to wait for a dark sky opportunity to test this. BYE and the camera don't know or care what is being captured and will behave the same as if you are connected to your 8" and shooting a planet.

It is better to play with BYE to become familiar with its operation and work out the details in the house with a lens on the camera before traveling to your dark sky site.

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First, thanks for telling us  which version of BYE you are using and which model of camera you are shooting with. These are important pieces of information that most first-time posters neglect to include.

In Planetary and Frame & Focus modes, you can control the brightness of the image by turning off BYE's Maximum Sensitivity setting and adjusting the ISO and Shutter values in the Capture Plan Center. When using a lens you can also darken the image by raising the f/stop to reduce the amount of light that is being let in to the sensor. Set the lens to f/12, the ISO to 400, and the Shutter to 1 second. Then progressively shorten the Shutter to see the image begin to darken.

When you tame the image brightness, you will probably discover that your lens just has too short a focal length for planetary imaging. Longer focal lengths in the range of 4000-6000mm are commonly used for capturing the planets. You will also probably notice that when you darken the image so that the brightest objects are not overexposed, that the rest of the image is dark. This is because Planetary mode uses the camera's LiveView capability. When you adjust the Shutter during LiveView, you are not changing the actual duration of the LiveView frame or the frame rate, just the amount of digital brightening that is performed by the camera. LiveView exposures are always just a few milliseconds in length.

 

 

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